Childhood Toys That Are Worth a Small Fortune

We keep some toys in our attics and basements because they hold nostalgic importance to us. We remember which relative gave them to us and at which holiday, and we feel a certain kind of joy when we remember carrying them around with us everywhere we went.

Did you know some of the toys you kept simply because you loved them could be worth anywhere between $300 and $150,000? In this list, you’ll find some wildly popular toys and others that ended up being rarer than most people realize. Do you have any of these toys?

The Orignial Lite Brite

Reddit / Lite-Brite

Ah, the simpler days when plugging colorful pegs into a lightbox kept an entire generation amused for hours! This was back before iPads and hand-held gaming devices.

Lite Brite debuted in 1967, and it sold for $10. If you still have one today, you can get a 3000% return on your investment. That’s right; the original Lite Brite is now selling for $300!

Barbie in a Swim Suit

History.com

It isn’t challenging to find Barbies for sale because they quickly rose in popularity and have stayed popular since the 1960s. In the Barbie world, it’s all about having the holy grail of Barbies if you want to make some real money. A first edition Barbie with the classic black-and-white striped swimsuit is now worth up to $20,000 at auction. That’s not a bad deal when you consider this doll initially cost $3 when it debuted in 1959.

Hot Wheels Van

Caranddriver.com

This Hot Wheels pink rear-loading Volkswagon Beach Bomb van is probably worth more than your real-life car. Not only is it super cool to look at and nostalgic for those who owned it as kids, but it was also quickly discontinued from Mattel’s line because it didn’t fit on the Mattel race track. To date, only two of these scarce toys have been found. Most recently, one of the vans sold $72,000 at auction. We think this proves some people never outgrow their childhoods.

Superman Toy

ebay

If you need a quick $20,000, we hope you happen to have one of these guys lying around. In 1940, this 13-inch tall Superman action figure was created by the Ideal Novelty and Toy Company. The toy has become one of the most highly valued collectible toys globally, mainly because it was the first to ever be made for the Superman franchise. When it was first sold in stores, it went for 94 cents. With a current selling price of more than $20,000, it’s now worth almost 30,000 times more than the original MSRP!

Cabbage Patch Kids

Pinterest

It looks like adoption fees have skyrocketed in the Cabbage Patch! In 1984 you could adopt one of these little guys or gals for $40. The dolls started as hand-stitched “sculptures” by Xavier Roberts in 1976 but debuted in a newer form eight years later. If you had the foresight to hold onto the doll you found under the Christmas tree in 1984, you could sell it today for upwards of $1,000 in mint condition!

Telescopic Light Saber Darth Vader

theswca.com

In 1978 you could purchase Star Wars toys for $2.49 each. Today, you can sell this particular toy for $6,000. While this may look like “another toy” to some, it’s considered a must-have for any serious Star Wars collector. Only a few hundred of the Telescopic Light Saber Darth Vaders were created by Kenner because the extended lightsaber was considered undesirable amongst the parents of children who owned them.

Furbys

Pinterest

First of all, if you’ve ever had one of these, you can understand why someone would want to sell them. Second, at one point, the National Security Agency banned these toys from Fort Meade over concerns they could listen in on conversations. Yes. That’s a true story.

The Furby debuted in 1998. That Christmas, parents were fighting each other in store aisles to get their hands on one. The toys could talk to each other, made weird sounds, and had creepy blinking eyes. These hyper-active electronic toys initially cost $35. Some of the first edition Furbys in mint condition are now selling for $900. That’s a lot of money to pay for an item that so many people found annoying . . . and a small price to get someone to take it off your hands.

Teddy Ruxpin

Pinterest

In 1985 you could purchase a Teddy Ruxpin doll for $69.99. That might sound kind of steep for a stuffed animal in the 1980s, but wait! There’s more . . . Teddy had a built-in cassette recorder, and he was an immediate smash hit among children. The doll remembers who you are, tells stories, and his eyes move, making children feel like he was genuinely engaging with them. If you have a Teddy Ruxpin doll in mint condition, you can sell him on eBay for $400. If your Teddy is showing some wear and tear, that’s okay. You can still get upwards of $150. Try getting that kind of return on your standard cassette player.

Strawberry Shortcake Doll

Lulu Berlu

This cutie patootie is Mint Tulip, and she’s one of the Strawberry Shortcake dolls. She first appeared in 1979, when parents paid mere pennies on the dollar to bring her home to their children. Today, this little gal is selling for $1,000!

This Toy Crane

Lionel Lines

We’re going to cut to the chase on this one–this Lionel 3360 Burro Crane sold for $85,062.25 on an eBay auction!

This toy, built in the 1950s, was a prototype for many model cranes constructed after it. Lionel trains are considered some of the best-built models of all time, which is why some people are willing to spend that kind of money on a rare toy. If you happen to have one, you might consider selling it and buying hundreds of awesome toys for the kids in your life!

Pokemon Pikachu Illustrator Card

Adapt Network

The Pokemon trading card game quickly grew to wild popular in January 1999. It’s remained a much-loved part of childhood as brothers and sisters have passed their cards down to their younger siblings. You might want to raid your Pokemon stash and look feverishly for a Pikachu Illustrator card. The card features a rare double star, AND only six of the cards were made throughout the franchise’s history. If you happen to have one of these cards, you can sell it for $150,000!

RocketFACTS


History Facts - Indian Independence

  1. The first Prime Minister of independent India was Jawaharlal Nehru. At his infamous inauguration, he delivered his now-famous speech, "Tryst with Destiny".
  2. Dr. B.R. Ambedkar wrote the final draft of the Indian constitution, which is one of the longest in the world. It was adopted formally on November 26, 1949, nearly two years after the declaration of the nation's independence.
  3. The Indian Constitution was legally declared valid on January 26, 1950. The date is celebrated across the country as its official "Republic Day".
  4. The official Day of Independence is August 15. It was chosen by Lord Mountbatten, the first governor-general and last viceroy of India, as it was the same day in 1945 that allied forces defeated Japan at the end of World War II.
  5. The official Indian national flag was designed by Pingali Venkayya, an agriculturalist and freedom fighter.
  6. While the entire nation of India was celebrating their independence day, M.K. Gandhi, who was a leading figurehead of the movement, was not present. At the time, Gandhi was fasting in order to end the Hindu-Muslim riots in Bengal.

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