Signs You May Need a Stairlift

Why a Stairlift?

You’ve worked hard for your home. It might be paid off and has significant sentimental value. Due to various circumstances, however, it might be difficult to maneuver around your home when there are stairs involved. No one should feel trapped in their own home.

If you’ve ever been hesitant about climbing the stairs, it’s time to consider a lift and reclaim independence and mobility. Lifts don’t take up too much room, so anyone can still use the stairs with the chair folded up. At the end of the day, health and safety are prime considerations in choosing a solid model. Other concerns to think about before making an investment include: stair dimensions and stability, who is using the system, and budget. When it comes to budget concerns, some insurance policies can cover or partially cover the costs of a stairlift.

Breaking Down the Top Brands

The number of brands available in the marketplace are astounding to anyone who’s decided to buy a lift. The best course of action for the prepared consumer is to compare the top brands today. Get to know the features built into each lift to make the best choice.

Ameriglide

Ameriglide customers get more than a seat as they will also benefit from the wireless call station and footrest sensors. Weight capacities range from 300 to 350 pounds. Ameriglide comes with a few installation options, including straight, curved, or outdoor. These lifts vary from about $1,300 to $6,300. The price variation depends upon the stair shape. Curved installations will always cost more than straight designs.

Acorn

Acorn is unique among its competitors as it doesn’t connect to the wall and has a relatively short installation period. This lift supports itself on the staircase itself, hugging the railing so that the staircase’s design features are still observable from afar. This manufacturer typically charges about $3,000 for their lifts. However, this amount varies when it comes to the model type and installation details.

Stannah

Stannah is a reliable manufacturer over 100 years old and sells several different lifts. It offers lifts in plenty of fun colors, from basic beige to bold maroon. Installation options include straight, narrow, and curved. Most models cost between $2,500 and $5,000. There is some flexibility with pricing, however, because the manufacturer sells refurbished items. There’s even a short-term rental plan for customers to test the product first before committing to fully investing in this product.

Bruno

Flexibility and a wide variety of options are all part of this solid lift’s design. This lift has a weight capacity of 400 pounds and the company boasts it has a luxurious appearance. There’s even the option of charging the chair at any point along its traveling path, too. These models are typically installed as a custom order, which makes their price variable. Customers can expect to pay around $2,000 or more, depending on individual installation options.

Harmar

The Harmar lift is a quality machine with a swivel seat that only requires the occasional vacuum to keep it looking clean. These models range from $3,000 to $5,000. A custom order may be lower or higher in price as the features are added or removed. Customers can enjoy a three-year warranty and can make easy adjustments across the chair.

Anyone’s property can become fully accessible again with the right lift. As with any product, don’t hesitate to ask for a quote on a lift to see if it fits within your desired budget; each installation is unique to the home it resides in. Prospective customers may find that the lift they want is not as expensive as they originally believed.

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